Tag Archives: Globetrotter

Wildlife and rest in Paracas, Peru

We escaped the floods – where to next?

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Once safe in Lima we had to decide where to go next. All roads into the mountains, our preferred destination, were still closed due to recent landslides and continuous flood risks so we had to stay by the coast.

One of the few places not to have been flooded was the small coastal village of Paracas, 4 hrs south of Lima. We met a French couple in our hostel in Lima who recommended it and confirmed it was free from floods. Perfect! The next day we were there.

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The main attraction in Paracas is the beautiful desert coastline that is the Nature reserve of Paracas and its close location to other interesting towns, ICA, Nasca, and a few km up the coast the larger fishing town of Pisco.

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After spending 1 night in in a rubbish little hostel I went looking for a more spacious place to stay. After walking round for half an hour I found a nice cheap little hostel with great communal space, a clean kitchen and fridge, a cat, a dog, a kitten and a little girl called Cielo. Perfect for Scott! Also a little park close by where the local kids hangout with a great set of monkey bars. Perfect for Ingrid. All in all a perfect place to chill out for a few days.

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Time to do nothing much

Schoolwork every morning or afternoon, followed by long walks on the beach, cooking together, playing in the park and going on little excursions.

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There is an area in Paracas filled with luxury houses and hotels, so eating out is not very cheap but with not much in our schedule here we liked spending time buying ingredients and cooking. Ingrid got her mojo back after her tummy bug and was keen to help me cook. Scott as always loves helping with any meal. A huge batch of Chile con carne got everyone back in great sprits!

The beach in Paracas is a beautiful wildlife sanctuary but not great for swimming as there is quite a lot of seaweed in the water. Instead we loved long walks to the kite surf club and back among flamingos, pelicans, sea lions and many other beautiful wild birds.

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Deserts and wildlife while waiting for the mountains

We had a great day swimming in one of the best beaches in Peru, a 15 min drive through the desert from Paracas at Mina beach.

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We went there early in the morning after at stop  to admire the red beach in the desert landscape along the way. Once at Mina, we climbed down the stairs to the sandy beach tucked away between 2 big sandy hills. Fresh, clear  and sparkling clean water, what a great little place for a swim. We paid S70 (£15) for a private car to take us there and wait 3 hrs to then the us back plus S 40 to enter the national park.IMG_9221

We  also did the mandatory boat trip to see the amazing wildlife our on the Islas Ballistas. The tickets cost S35 per person, but then just before boarding the boat they tell you to pay the national park tax as well S15 per person. 2 hrs of sea lions, pelicans, penguins and boobies with a great guide in a quiet and comfortable speedboat is well worth the money. The roaring herds of Sealions made the most amazing sound as we bobbed along the cliffs in the boat.

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So even though we enjoyed our time here, some days hiding for the blowing sand in our room, we would not have stayed here more than a few days under normal circumstance. Given the trauma and illness over the past 2 week in Trujillo and Huanchaco, this was a good place for us to rest and recharge our batteries, just be together and not do too much. We are all ready and excited to finally go into the mountains in Cuzco and Machu Picchu.

Feeling emotional – Peru in floods

Feelings of doubt

Piles of rubbish and dead sea life after the floods

The past few days have been very emotional. For the first time on our trip I have gone through waves of doubt and distress wishing we were back home in the UK…. I hit an all time low just after the roof fell in in our hostel in Trujillo and then seeing Peru in floods with many people in distress on the news realising all the roads were closed and we were trapped.

The floods are still happening although water has started to reside in some areas Trujillo and Chiclayo are still under water, Lima and many many other areas have been hit by flash floods and land slides. Meanwhile, we are glad that we can pay our way to safety in an apartment hotel in nearby Huanchaco

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Taking refuge in Huanchaco

Now a couple of days later, safe from the floods in a flat in Huanchaco, just a few km up along the coast the feelings of doubt have mellowed somewhat. I would not choose to take the kids to a natural disaster zone if I could avoid it but at the same time this is real life, this is most likely the effects of global warming, this is the world we are creating for our children and it is happening right now.

Floods and mud in northern Peru

Feeling and seeing with their own eyes the consequence of global warming and how precarious life is makes you really appreciate the things that matter the most, safety and life itself.

The roof falls in

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The roof starts to fall in

We knew it had been raining a lot more than usual in parts of Peru, all the locals said so. When climbing in at the Base camp, the climbing wall in Lima enquiring about climbing in Cajamarca and Huaraz, the guide told me there is too much rain to climb and that a lot of land slides have made many routes unsafe.

We spent 3 days exploring Lima before heading north on a 10hr night bus to Trujillo for the sun and moon temples with a plan to go forth north east after a few days into the mountains.

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Magic water fountains in Lima

Once in Trujillo we could see on the news that big landslides and floods in the north along many of the big rivers causing the northern region and 811 cities in Peru to declare a sate of emergency. No busses or traffic can travel on the pan American highway that goes along the north coast into Ecuador.

Flooded cities in a state of emergency

The second night of heavy rain, I woke Paul up around 10.30pm when a big chunk of the roof in the middle of our room fell to the floor. The electricity was not working so in the light of our head torches we could se water gushing in through the wall by Ingrids bed and more chunks of the roof falling in, this time on top of the bunk bed Ingrid was sleeping in.

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The roof falls in on Ingrids bed

All the while Scott was happily sleeping in the bottom bunk in one of the other beds in our room. We decided that Paul and Scott would stay the night in our room in the relative safety in the bottom bunks and moved the bed slightly to where the roof looked less likely to collapse. Ingrid was awake and very scared so we quickly moved her into a bed in one of the relatively dry and safe dorm rooms full of excited German youth while Paul and I moved all he bags up onto the beds safe from water on the floor.

Bathroom roof falls in

At this point we did not realise the extent of the flooding in other parts of Trujillo and now also Lima together with many other areas Chosica, Piura, Chiclayo, Ica to mention a few…we only saw it on the news once we have managed to get to Huanchaco, a few km further north the next morning.

Central Trujillo under water for the 6th time in a week

Roads closed – change of plans

As the internet was not working anywhere we could only talk to people and watch the news to try and inform ourselves of the situation and the risks of flooding and damaged roads. We found out through a girl in the hostel that one of the bus companies were not running any services at all as they had had 2 accidents with overturned busses in the past 3 days…

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At the bus terminal

We had bus tickets to go on a mountainous 8hr bus trip to Cajamarca  at 2900m that day, but I was actually relieved to find out that the roads were closed as it made our decision about weather or not to go easy. At the bus office they confirmed no busses were running north or east to Cajamarca due to land slides,. The main road to Lima was also closed as one of the big road tunnels had collapsed.

Enjoying the here and now

Boys go surfing in Huanchaco

Rain is forecasted for another 5 days and more and more towns are hit by the floods as the rivers continue their paths down the mountains. In Huanchaco, we are safe for now staying in a flat a relatively expensive apartment hotel but you can’t put a price on feeling safe, especially when it comes to the kids. Ingrid was really shaken up after the roof fell in and is now after a couple of days of school work, beach and surfing starting to get back to her normal self again.

Huanchaco playpark

We have had to put our plans to go to Cajamarca and Chachapoyas over the next 3 weeks on hold and try to enjoy ourselves here and now while we wait for the roads to open. The logical part of me says this is all part of living in the now and appreciating the things around us rather than planning and wishing for things that may or may not happen while the emotional me would prefer to be somewhere else…

Here and now in Huachaco, the food is good, the flat is good, there is a little playground just across the road a good surfing beach and we are getting back into schoolwork.

Afternoon of school work

All in all things could be a lot worse and our thought go out to the people of Peru who are not as lucky as we are….

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Home comforts & temptations in Miami

Catching up with friends

 

 

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We had our 1st hot shower in a week at our friends house in Miami. I had almost forgotten the lovely feel of crisp clean sheets in your bed and the calm feeling of home that we enjoyed here while relaxing for a few days. The children had a great time hanging out with their friends and the 2 dogs and Paul and I loved the opportunity to catch up with Celia and Jean, our dear old friends from London.

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Kids playing football in the garden
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Taking Magic for a walk

We didn’t do much here apart from chilling out. Paul took the kids to Wynwood walls and south beach while I went to the hairdresser to get some long overdue highlights done. We spent another day at the mall stocking up on essentials such as socks and pens, new kindles to replace our cracked ones and a new tables since our last one got stolen in Nicaragua.

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Wynwood walls Miami
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Climbing is not just a sport its art
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South Beach Mimi

 

Shopping temptation in the American shopping mall

As we are out of the habit of shopping I was interested to see how Ingrid and Scott would react in the mall. Would the old “I want this, I need that” come back or would they stay as uninterested in buying and having things as they have been over the last few months?

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Scott going for a roller coaster ride in a pair of 3D phone goggles

The only things we had to get Ingrid and Scott got a new t shirt and pair of shorts each, the first clothes we have bought them since we left London. With all the temptations of an American mall I have to say, I was surprised that they keep their calm and only asked for ice cream! which is a treat you cannot deny them after a long morning of Not shopping. We still had a lot of fun looking at all the crazy things you can buy. I am happy to say the we walked away from the mall having bought only the things we really needed.

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Ice cream break

Leaving home…..again

While at the house, when not playing with the dogs, Scott spent most of the time in Sebastiens room playing with all the toys. Ingrid took the opportunity to find a bit of space to read as usual.

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Scott playing with Sebbies toys
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Comfy bed for a bit of Ingrid reading time

The feeling of “home” can be a bit unsettling for all of us as we all of a sudden are reminded of many of the simple home comforts we don’t always have while we travel such as individual space, fridge and kitchen,  clean sheets and towels and little things like that that can make it hard to get going again. So, when it was time to leave I was excited to see that the kids were happy, relaxed and ready to go on our next adventure in Peru. As Scott put it, travelling is fun when its not boring because you get to do and see new things. 

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Miami airport – We re off to Lima Peru

So after a month of having our own little home in Nicaragua and a few days in the home of our drear friends we are ready to rough it again end explore the present and past of Peru

 

 

 

 

 

Magical moments among Nicaraguas volcanoes

Nicaragua is the land of volcanoes and lakes so while we enjoyed not doing many touristy things during our stay here, some things are simply unmissable.

Swimming in Laguna de Apoyo – the crater lake

In the centre of the Pacific strip of Nicaraguan territory, along the long volcanic chain that crosses the country from north to south, is a large and extinct crater. In the centre is one of the most beautiful lagoons in Nicaragua, Laguna de Apoyo.

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Ingrid loves swimming and Scott has found a stick as usual

We went to one of a handful of hostels located here for a day pass to their “beach club”. The entrance fee to spend the day is 6.00 dollars per person and 3.00 dollars for children from 6 to 12 years old. We spent the day relaxing in a sun bed overlooking the lake on one of the spacious terraces. We went kayaking, swimming played ping pong and petanque, all which is included in the entrance fee. Getting here is easy from Granada by chicken bus and taxi or shuttle service that takes you all they way there.

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Ingrid paddle boarding
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Me paddle boarding and Ingrid hitching a ride
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Playing games at the Laguna Beach club

Watching bubbling lava at the awesome Masaya volcano

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You can see the lava churning in the crater

We went with Erick tours out of Granada for a night viewing of the volcano. We spent a few hours exploring Massaya town before heading up the actual volcano just before sunset. There is a bit of a wait to get up to the volcano as they only allow 50 people at a time, but our guide, Alberto, was excellent. He spent the waiting time giving us information on  Nicaragua volcanoes & Masaya and the general history of Nicaragua.

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Lava!! at Masaya Volcano

Once at the top, the lava lights up the whole sky in a magical orange glow! Amazing view of the bubbling lava but strong sulphur fumes means you can only stay 15 min at the top. We were all seriously coughing by then and glad to get off the top of the volcano.

Rooftop ride to swim in the cool waters of Aguas Agrias

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Cool mammas on the roof on our way to the lagoon

In the rural community of Aguas Agrias, located south of the Mombacho Volcano , is a stunning natural lagoon where the locals go to cool off.  Together with friends we took a pick up truck there and enjoyed an epic ride on the roof. We spent a few hours swimming in the cool waters watching the monkeys overhead. Simply wonderful!

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Beautiful natural lagoon in the jungle
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Howler monkeys in the canopy while we were swimming
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The locals come here too
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Scott and Gekko having fun
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Me and Scott enjoying the sunshine

Sunset at the Treehouse

On the way from Aguas Argias we went to the Treehouse for an amazing dinner at sunset. The Treehouse is located half an hours drive from Granada, 200m up in the jungle. 

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Canopy bridge with treehouse on the right

Its is a wonderful place to bring he kids, although some  might think its perhaps a bit dangerous for little ones. The actual house is built into the side of volcano Mombacho, surrounded by howler monkeys, complete with a  fire mans pole, some swings and a 60 metre canopy bridge connecting the main house where you eat to a smaller house where you can sleep in hammocks. The kids have never climbed up 200m so fast before in their life. We stayed for drinks, a communal meal and a truly beautiful sunset.

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Sunset at the Treehouse outside Granada
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Sunset from the Treehouse

Other things we enjoyed in Granada

Pottery practice

Pottery class making our own eggcups out of red clay from are area of san Juan de Oriente. We all had a go under the instruction of the watchful eye of the master, Carlos. We were not very successful, but persuaded him to sell us the little creations we made. Eggcups!

Watching the annual parade at the global poetry festival

The International Poetry Festival celebrates poets from around the world (and is also the largest poetry festival in the world).  We didn’t go to any of the poetry readings but enjoyed the many events that took place in Granada’s open plazas, parks, churches, and markets. The highlight for us was the Carneval which made its way trough the centre of Granada stopping at every street corner for a poetry reading.

School for a month in Nicaragua

Swapping expensive Costa Rica for a more affordable stay in Nicaragua

It was only in the last few weeks of our time in Asia that we actually started looking at the next phase of our travel in Central and South America. As we got more into the details of travel blogs and websites we realised that the initial plan of spending a long time in Cost Rica would be difficult for us as the cost of food, accommodation  of and travel is pretty much on par with Western Europe. Too expensive for us!

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Catedral de Granada one of many beautiful churches here

Searching for ways to make or time cheaper we started looking at Nicaragua as a potentially cheaper option.  In the end, we decided we would go either to Costa Rica or Nicaragua as long as we could find a self catering place to stay in close to somewhere all 4 of us could learn Spanish. We had always planned to do a Spanish course at the beginning of our 6 months in Central and South America, to help us get around more easily, to fully enjoy our time in this part of the world and to be able to talk to people beyond Hello and Thank you.

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Leaving our house for school

Finding a school for Ingrid and Scott

The 2 weeks of rest in Koh Chang was invaluable for us in researching Costa Rica and Nicaragua. I spent many hours trawling through blogs and FB groups to find some contacts that could help us with affordable AirBnB or other self catering place where we could settle in and lay low for a few weeks. How hard can it be to find an appropriate school that can take the kids in for month and to help them learn Spanish. VERY!!

Ingrid and Scott are too little to benefit form 1-1 classes in Spanish and just throwing them into a local school for a few weeks is simply not giving them the time to learn enough Spanish to make friends and understand anything the teachers say.

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Ingrid and Scott in Koh Chang – still so little!

I contacted lots of bi-lingual schools (English & Spanish) in Costa Rica and Nicaragua and eventually got some leads through a closed FB group for travelling families and some closed Expat groups for people living in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. I contacted one of the schools recommended and finally found a little school willing to accept both children, for 1-2 months at a cost. As luck would have it, the school was located in the heart of Granada, the first town we were planning to go to in Nicaragua.

Preparing for school in Granada

We arrived in Granada on Friday night and Ingrid and Scott would spend their first day in school on the following Tuesday. A quick visit to the school on Monday to see Miss Beth, the Head mistress and director who helped me getting the children into the school via FB and email, to get all the paper work sorted. Ingrid and Scott also got a chance to see some of the children who go there, helping them mentally prepare for the official school start the following day.

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Beautiful colours on our way to see the school in Granada

Sancuanjoche is a small but perfectly shaped school with class rooms on 2 levels around a shaded courtyard where the children have lunch and hang out during recess.

The pre-school where Scott is going is spacious and creative with 4 classrooms set up for the different ages and needs. It also has a big open room for  play during break time and a little park just across the road for a run around when the weather is not too hot.

Completely bilingual school and curriculum

The school has about 80 students in classes 1-7 from the age of 6 and up and the adjacent pre-school  run groups with children aged 3 to 6. Classes have a maximum of 16 students with a great mix of native English and Spanish speakers and all teachers are bilingual too.

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Happy to be back in school again

English, Maths, Science and Social studies are taught in English and Spanish. All students have Spanish class every day and in addition, English or Spanish as a second language depending on which native language they speak. The school day runs from 8 till 3, an hour longer than school in the Uk.

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Ingrids school day is full of Spanish – exciting!

In pre-school all classes are also bilingual but with more focus more on learning through play and social interaction. Here there is also Spanish class for the English speakers and vice versa every day. Scott’s school day is slightly shorter than Ingrids and finishes at 1 .

Miss Beth and her staff were super friendly and welcoming. Ingrid and Scott were both excited and nervous about starting school the following day.

First day in Nicaraguan school – one month to go

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Looking for school uniforms at the local market

I picked up the school uniforms at the local market after visiting the school. When I saw the kids putting them on the next morning, getting excited my heart simply melt and filled with pride at their ability to take it all in a stride. Scotts nervousness made him worried and upset he wasn’t looking cool enough and Ingrid was very quiet…..Pancakes for breakfast much earlier than we’re used to and then we were ready to go.

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First walk to school

After a 20 min walk in the warm sunshine we arrived at school. At the sight of his teacher, Lauren, who reminded him very much of Miss Lavander, his first teacher back in England, he happily went in and waved good bye.

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Scott happily heading into school
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First piece of writing in Spanish

As we approached Ingrids school round the corner she went all serious, looked at us and said, ” You are not coming in. I am not related to you!”. This was the first but definitely not the last time she was worried about her parents embarrassing her!

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Ingrid heading off -too cool for mum and dad these days

Im excited to find out at the end of the week what school is really like and how the kids get on. Im sure their Spanish will be better than mine and Pauls by the time we leave Nicaragua!

 

 

 

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