Ingrid and Scott go to School in Bolivia

Homeschooling while travelling

With lots of travel over the past 2 months formal school work had to take a back seat while learning took the shape of experiences and instead.

Ingrid especially like academic work and during times where we have ben doing less of that she has a tendency to become brain bored and start annoying Scott, myself or Paul. Scott on the other hand does not miss formal learning at all. Staying in Samaipata for a month, without any travel would allow us to do another push on school work while living and enjoying rural Bolivia.

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Enjoying the space of our own little house

Its is always a bit of a struggle for all of us to get back into schoolwork after weeks of travel so to prepare the kids and make them positive about getting back into it we sat down and agreed on a Mon- Fri, 9.30-1 school schedule with the children.

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Scotts school with the schedule we made together and sticker reward charts

Ingrid made her weekly schedule with Paul in an excel spreadsheet, while Scott and I set up a plan on the wall with a mix of learning and games that he could choose from each day to earn stickers. Ingrid had 3 x 45 min sessions with 3 15m breaks while school did 30 min sessions mixing play and learning.

A school in the mountains that can’t be found

During our first week in Samaipata, this set up worked really well. Breakfast, school, lunch and then a walk exploring the town and surroundings in the afternoon, going to the market and cooking food together in the house. Paul was setting up Ingrids work and managing to do some job searching at the same time. For me however, school with Scott is all consuming leaving me no time to do anything else.

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A lesson in sewing and home economics…mend and make do!

I enjoy it but after 4 hrs of pushing him through the tasks we are both pretty tired of each other.  Also, after a week of this much intense time together in the little house, we were all starting to get a bit of cabin fever.

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Ingrid and Scott having a break doing junk modelling

Ideally we had wanted to get the kids into local school as soon as possible, but after a week of inquiring we just had the name of a school up in the mountains for which I had found the Facebook page on-line. However, with no address, contact or any way of finding it we almost decided to give up hope.

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The school Facebook page but with no contact details

The fact that the school was up in the mountains somewhere outside the town also seemed really unpractical for us as we would have no way of getting the kids there and back everyday. In the end we agreed that homeschooling for the duration of our time here would be ok and we’d simply take turns job hunting in the 1 cafe in Samaipata with internet in the afternoons. At least we had a nice little house with enough space for use to teach the kids without getting under each others feet.

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Internet access only at cafe 1900 in Samaipata, Bolivia

We visit Communidad Educativa Flor de Montana

Finally after a discussion with the host of our AirBNB house, she managed to find us the number for the school principle Lilliana on Monday night week 2. I Whatsapped her asking if we could visit the school and our children potentially go there for a month. On Tuesday morning we went there to visit and on Wednesday morning Ingrid and Scott had their first full day in Bolivian school.

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The Bolivian school buildings and playing fields

15 min in a taxi, up up up on a dirt road just outside town is Communidad Educativa Flor de Montana. I was a bit sceptical having only seen images of a mud house under construction on Facebook and the barbed wired fence and basic building that greeted us did not install much confidence either. We crossed the big playing field and went up to the house to greet Liliana, the head mistress. The school buildings were rustic, built with adobe mud out of the ground and recycled bottles and old broken windowpanes for windows. The green landscape and views were stunning in the cold and fresh the morning breeze. We could hear the wind in the trees, birds chirping and happy children chattering and I was starting to get a good feeling about this.

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The main school building and view over Samaipata in the background

Scott and Ingrid had both firmly said they would not be going to this school before we got there and they remained apprehensive and shy while Lilliana explained to us that the school was initiated and funded by parents and how recently been fully licensed as a school by the local authorities. She explained the the school ethos was to live happily and creatively in harmony with nature and all living things. Paul and I liked the sound of this but Scott and Ingrid were not interested or impressed.

The magical climbing tree that changes everything

The school has 24 children in 3 classes ages 5-6, 7-8, & 9-11. First we went to see the little preschool class that would be relevant for Scott. On top of the hill in a little room 6 children eagerly eyed up Scott asking him things in Spanish we could not understand. Im not going in said Scott and hid behind me. I managed to have little chat with Scotts teacher in Spanish as she could not speak any English at all. We were still all bit unsure if this could work at all.

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The amazing climbing tree that won Ingrids heart

We left Scotts class to go see Ingrid potential new class mates. By this time Ingrid was grumpy and her body language completely closed off. Before going in Lilliana pointed out to us the amazing school climbing tree and Ingrids face suddenly lit up. Ingrid loves climbing, mountains, trees, monkey bars…almost anything and by the looks of it, this would be an amazing tree to climb.

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Playing in the tree

Up she went high into the tree up in the rickety treehouse and down she swung on the ring hanging from a big branch. When she came down she peered into the class room and said, I love it. Ingrids teacher did not speak any English either but at that point it didn’t matter. The climbing tree had closed the deal and with Ingrid happy and excited, Scott just followed her lead. We agreed to pay the school a fee in exchange for the children to go there for 4 weeks starting the next morning.

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Scott having a go

Early morning start for a fully loaded school bus

The next morning we had an early start to catch the school bus on the town square at 7.30 for a 8.00 school start.

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Walk to the school bus

We had no real idea what they would need to bring but packed the same bags they’d brought to school in Nicaragua with a pencil and a folder to write in, water, some fruit and crackers hoping that would be enough. Excitement and nerves were playing up in the morning but Ingrid excitement about the climbing tree blew any other doubts away and Scott joined her enthusiasm.

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Waiting for the bus

Waiting for the bus at the square in the cold morning air, we recognised 2 children from the day before and introduced ourselves wondering what would happen next. Suddenly a little minibus appeared and the kids all climbed in. Paul got in too and would run back down again after making sure they both got to their class ok.

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This little bus fist 30 people!

Coming back Paul told me in amazement that the little minibus pictured below picked up all 24 kids and 5 teachers along the way and got them all safely to school. Now all we had to do was wait for the kids real verdict when they came back from school in the afternoon.

Mixed reports on their 1st day in Bolivian school

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Ingrid feeling a bit apprehensive on her first day in school

We were waiting eagerly at the square as the bus arrived back at 1 o’clock. As it was a Wednesday, Ingrid would go a full day with extra classes of drama and art in the afternoon and only return at 5.30. Scott on the other hand would come back down with the other little ones at 1. The bus arrived at the square but Scott was not there!! A quick call to Liliana only to find out that Scotts teacher thought he was supposed to stay with Ingrid for the full day and so did not let him on the bus. Scotty was a bit upset as I spoke to him on the phone so I took a taxi up to the school straight away to get him.

When I finally got him in the taxi heading home, he was ok but sad that he had not made any new friends! Scott always makes friends regardless of any language barriers so this really got me worried.

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Talking to Scott about his first day in school

Ingrid on the other hand came back home at 5.30 beaming and starving having had a great time making new friends while not understanding a word in class. Great!

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Ingrid and Anna

In the end they were both happy to go back to school the next day, Scott with some extra words of encouragement and ideas on how to make friends. At the end of day 2 they were both happy and excited about their new school, music class and making pottery as well as new Bolivian friends and Paul and I were happy to finally have some time get into our plans for going back to the UK.

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Ingrid, Anna and Hannah in a group hug
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