Living with kids in Bolivia – good advice from Facebook friends change our plans

Don’t believe everything you read

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As we were getting into the month of May we needed to settle down somewhere and start thinking about what to do at the end of our year long trip in July. We had started looking for UK jobs already in February while we were living in Nicaragua, only to realise that it was too far out in the future to yield any results. Now was the right time to get into our homecoming plans properly, but where could we settle down for a bit do so?

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Settling in and looking for a job while in Nicaragua

We had agreed that the country we would stay in would be Bolivia, simply for the reason of cost. Bolivia is one of the cheapest countries in South America still and as we were approaching the end of our 12 month travel, our remaining budget was becoming increasingly important in our decision making. I had done some research about travel in Bolivia during our time in Peru and Chile and was feeling a bit apprehensive about staying here for a a month or more after reading about travellers experiences of unfriendly people, dangerous roads, rubbish food and dangerous dogs.  However we know by now not to trust everything we read but rather to follow our own instincts as it always takes a bit of time to adjust to the people and the culture in a new country. After a week here our first impressions of Bolivia did not match the negative things we had read so we thought we’d give it a go and stay.

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Carlos, one of our new friends in Bolivia

While exploring Sucre for a few days, we initially thought we might stay there and enjoy the more developed part of Bolivia. However, we quickly decided we didn’t want to stay there due to the pollution and big town feel.

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Sucre the white city

Paul and I had agreed that our the top priority for the next month or so was to stay somewhere cheap with good internet access to help progress with our job hunting but we soon found ourselves doing the exact opposite.

Great advice from local Facebook groups

Back in January I had found some great Nicaraguan and and Costa Rican expats groups on Facebook. The expats in these groups are in may ways similar to us. Families and people that have left the old “western” way of life to enjoy a new and simpler life in other parts of the world.

By simply asking these likeminded people for advice on the best places to live with kids we found a great place to stay and a local school in Granada, Nicaragua. In the end Nicaragua turned out to be one of our favourite parts of our travel so far. So with no ideas of where to go next in Bolivia or what to do for the next 2 months other than avoiding the big cities and living cheaply, I contacted a Bolivian expats group on Facebook for some inspiration and advice from families who had already made the move.

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Expats Facebook groups have proved very useful

Change of priorities – and plans

Where in Bolivia is a good place to live for a travelling family with primary school age kids? I simply put this question to the few thousand people on the closed Facebook group and only minutes later the advice from friendly folk came thick and fast. Sucre, Cochabamaba, Tarija and Samaipata were the main 4 suggestions with lots of advice and information on why these friendly people through so. Cochabamaba and Sucre we had already ruled out due to size so that left Tarija and Samaipata. Tarija is located in the far southeast on the Argentine border so did not really fit our travel plans, but Samaipata to the east on the Amazon border would not be ideal either.

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After reading up about both places and compering the two I instantly felt that little rural Samaipata could be the right place. A small town of 3500 people, lovely climate of 25 degrees, in the mountains full of wildlife, plenty of things to do and see and with a small community of foreigners that we could tap into to for help.

 

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The Samaiapata crowd had also been particularly helpful on Facebook and that felt like a promising start. The main issue was internet coverage. After 2 weeks in Bolivia we already knew how poor internet is here so when we discovered that there is only 1 cafe in Samaipata with decent internet we knew we had to change our plans or our priorities.

Putting the new plan into action

Hours earlier, on Air BNB I had fond a great little house in the centre of Semaipata that was pretty cheap soI contacted the host to check that there was internet in the house. No was the answer, “but you can buy internet data to use on your phone with a Bolivian SIM”…Could we live for a month and look for jobs and houses back in the UK without good Internet access?? We agreed all other things about Samaipata seemed too good to turn down and so agreed we would go for it and make the job hunting process work one way or another.

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Our house in Samaipata, with a garden and mandarin trees.

Once decided, we started looking at how best to  get there. Bolivia is not a huge country but the mountainous terrain makes it hard to travel anywhere. From Sucre to Samaipata is about 400km but would take some 12 hrs on bumpy roads in an uncomfortable night bus. The advice I got from my new Facebook friends was “Fly don’t die” and so that is what we did. Only 2 days after posting the question Facebook, we were on our way to Samaipata.

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Leaving Sucre for Samaipata by plane via Santa Cruz

We flew from Sucre to Santa Cruz for about £40 each and then got a mini bus to Samaipata from there. Despite opting out of the bus it was not the easiest of journeys. After weeks in the cold high in the mountains we were also surprised and bit bothered by the heat as we got the bus from the airport to the minibus station in Santa Cruz.

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Quick break before the 3hr minibus up into the mountains
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9 people in a minibus. This guy got the short straw.

The mini bus schedule ran as most mini busses do in Bolivia, they leave when they are full rather than follow a specific schedule. So we let the first bus go in order to have something to eat and a quick travel break. The next bus didnt leave for another 2 hours when all the places were full. Finally, with one guy practically sitting on the gear stick, we were off to our next Bolivian adventure.

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Ingrid and Scotts school in Samaipata, Bolivia

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